Preppers Checklist

It makes no difference what you are prepping for, a SHTF scenario, natural or man made disaster, you need to put together a disaster preparedness kit and checklist to give you and your loved ones a greater chance of survival. It is recommended that you prepare your family to be self-sufficient and self-reliant for at least three days to a week - Keep in mind these suggestions are only Bare Minimum!

Some suggested Preps:

Water:

Store one gallon per person per day. Two quarts for drinking and two quarts for cooking.

Food:

You should have enough non-perishable foods on hand that your family can survive on for at least three days to one week.

Your food items should require no:

  • Refrigeration
  • Preparation or cooking
  • Little or no water

Choose foods that are compact, nutritionally dense, and have a long shelf life.

Cooking:

You should also have several alternative methods for cooking -

  • Camp stove/ w Extra Fuel
  • Barbecue Grill
  • Open Fire

Bug Out Bag, Go Bag, 72 Hr Kit Contents:

  • Mess Kit: Plates, Cups, Utensils
  • Emergency Preparedness Manual / Survival Manual
  • Battery Operated /Manual Crank Flashlight & Radio / w Extra Batteries
  • Waterproof Matches / Lighter / Fire Steel
  • Candles, Battery Operated Lamps, Lanterns /w Extra Lantern Fuel
  • Medical Kit / w First-Aid Manual
  • 30 Day Supply of your Prescription Medication if needed
  • High Quality Vitamin Supplements
  • Can Opener / P-38
  • Survival Knife & Camp Axe
  • Aluminum Foil
  • Garbage Bags / Ties
  • Important Documents
  • Ample Cash
  • Tent / Sleeping Bag / Wool Blankets / Sleeping Mat
  • Change of Seasonal Clothes per Person
  • Multi-Tool
  • Duct-Tape
  • Compass
  • Water Filter / Water Sanitation Tablets
  • Extra Bottled Water
  • Canteen / w Metal Cup
  • Ziploc / Plastic Bags / Plastic Containers
  • Signaling Devices
  • Needle & Thread
  • Heavy Water Proof Tarp / Drop Cloth/ Plastic Sheeting
  • Paracord / Rope / Twine
  • Up to Date Local Map
  • Sanitation / Personal Hygiene Items
  • Feminine supplies
  • Soaps / Detergents
  • OTC Medicines / Pain Relievers / Antacids / Anti-diarrhea
  • Extra Pair of Boots or Shoes / Wool Socks per Person
  • Work Gloves
  • Rain Gear
  • Hats / Gloves
  • Sunglasses / Extra Prescription Glasses / Contact Lenses and Supplies

You should have all your important documents organized during normal times; during disasters (man made or natural), you will want to make it a priority. Use this checklist to assemble your documents and make sure they're all up-to-date. You may want to keep some documents in a safe deposit box, fire-proof safe or other secure location. If so, keep copies handy for easy access and take them with you in the even of a disaster.

  • Financial Statements
  • Bank address and phone number (include all account numbers)
  • Retirement accounts name, address, phone numbers
  • Credit card numbers and expiration dates
  • Birth certificates
  • Marriage certificates
  • FOID Cards
  • Divorce decrees
  • Passport
  • Citizenship papers
  • Adoption papers
  • Social Security Cards
  • Drivers Licenses
  • State and Federal Tax Records
  • Fire, Homeowners, and Renters insurance policies
  • Life insurance policies
  • U.S. Savings Bonds, stocks, securities, deeds and mortgages
  • Car title and registration
  • Automobile insurance Policies / Cards
  • Last will and testament
  • Extra set of house and car keys

Considerations for your pets

  • Names and descriptions of any pets
  • Veterinarian's name, address and phone number
  • Extra Food & Water for your pets

Considerations for small children & babies:

  • Canned or Powered Formula
  • Diapers & Wipes
  • Bottles & Nipples
  • Powered Milk
  • Baby Food
  • Medications & Ointment
  • Entertainment: Games & Books

Other considerations would include:

  • Alternate methods of communications should land lines, cell phones, and internet go down, some suggestions might include battery operated walkie talkies / 2 way radios / FRS/GRS radios etc.
  • Alternate evacuation routes and modes of transportation.
  • Pre-determined Rendezvous points / Meeting Places.
This is just a rough list of suggestions and items, feel free to add / or delete items for your own personal needs.

24 Comments:

  1. Jeff Wise said...
    This is a really great list and there are items on there I never even thought about before such as the sanitation stuff to be honest with you. Especially if you have kids.
    Bushcraft and Survival Skills said...
    @Jeff Wise Thank you, I am glad you found it useful.
    Rayford said...
    But it really DOES matter when you prepare for CALAMITY you are embracing the culture of FEAR which drives illogical often counterproductive WHEN calamity strikes prepping. The correct thing to do is prepare for specific threats and tell yourself IF a Tornado strikes. IF a flood comes this will be useful. IF an oil crisis or economic collapse occurs this will be handy. Preparing for WHEN DISASTER strikes is pointless, foolish and counter-productive because there is no limit to an imaginary disaster scenario of nebulous proportions. No matter how prepared you are there is always something you forgot. Maybe you forgot your submarine or spaceship and 40 years of oxygen.. meh. Food/Water, Defensible shelter, Guns/Ammo/Kevlar, First Aid/Medicines, Security and Building materials Plywood,Hammer nails/screws, Duct Tape, Whistle, Energy(Fire,Electric/solar?), Generator, Batteries, Fuel, Bikes, Binoculars, an edible garden, intruder trip wire squeel alarms or dogs. Final item is hard currency and trade goods (something you dont need a credit card and internet to spend).

    You got this short list done you are 90% prepared for most scenarios and can stop worrying about DISASTER STRIKING.
    Bushcraft and Survival Skills said...
    @Rayford When I first started this blog, I did indeed struggled with that very fact, will I be embracing the the "culture of FEAR"? I reached a conclusion, and alas, the answer was resounding NO! I decided to use this blog as an educational tool, to help as many that wanted to receive it.

    Have you looked at all of the archives of this blog? There is nothing here about FEAR, it is all pure knowledge and education about Survival Skills, Bushcraft, and Emergency Preparedness. Through that education any FEAR one once had is vanquished, because one realizes they are prepared for most things.

    As far as the WHEN, yes it indeed DOES Matter. 2 Quotes come to mind:

    "Remember; when disaster strikes, the time to prepare has passed."

    "Preparedness, when properly pursued, is a way of life, not a sudden, spectacular program."

    But you see, you have taken a simple opening statement to a Preppers Checklist way to far my friend.

    If I prepare by studying for an exam I have later, does it mean I am fearful? No indeed it does not, it means I am a prudent man.

    "The prudent see danger and take refuge, but the simple keep going and suffer for it."
    -- Proverbs 27:12

    It also strikes me as odd that at the end of your comment you contradict yourself, 90% to be exact.

    You said: "You got this short list done you are 90% prepared for most scenarios and can stop worrying about DISASTER STRIKING."

    Which in essence says you are in 90% agreement with being prepared.

    Relax my friend, and work on the other 10% that keeps you in FEAR.
    Beau_az said...
    Definitely a great list of the things you will need to survive in any bad situation. I think that as I read through the list there were only a few items that I'm missing out on, and so this site is getting bookmarked for sure. Thanks for the great info.
    Bushcraft and Survival Skills said...
    @Beau_az You're very welcome, I am glad that you found the list useful!
    jasboo_94 said...
    My prepping will start with this page being bookmarked!! Between the list above, your archived pages, and the several links that you provided, this is the best site I've found for someone looking to get involved in prepping. Great job and keep up the good work!!
    Bushcraft and Survival Skills said...
    @jasboo_94 Thank you! I do my best to post quality information to help as many people as I can. :-)
    Siobhan said...
    Hi,

    Great site! I'm trying to find an email address to contact you on to ask if you would please consider adding a link to my website. I'd really appreciate if you could email me back.

    Thanks and have a great day!
    Bushcraft and Survival Skills said...
    @Siobhan

    Thanks I appreciate that! I would be happy to exchange links with you as long as your site is Survival, Bushcraft or Prepper related. I checked your blogger profile and I did not see any email or website listed.

    I would say leave your website here in the comment section and we will go from there.
    ExAFCop said...
    Preparing for emergency is much better than waiting for it to happen and saying oh s**t. My wife and I are prepping to include buying extra food, preparing bug out bags, storing water (bottled mostly) etc.

    If disaster never happens, we will be able to live for at least 6 months on what we have stored now.

    do we fear disaster, NO we are prepared. We live in the tornado belt and most of these items would be what we would need if we lost our house. We could grab bug out bags and head for our shelter and be able to get our lives back together.
    Bushcraft and Survival Skills said...
    @ExAFCop Exactly Right! I am glad you and your wife see the value and peace of mind of being prepared for any emergency. I might make one humble suggestion...learn how to procure, purify, and sterilize water using both commercial water filtration systems, and using survival / primitive methods, you would have to have literally tons of bottled water to make it through 6 month period, learning different ways and having other methods available to you and your wife will make your preparedness plan that much better.
    Anonymous said...
    This is a good list, We started preparing one yr ago just for any reason, work strike, layoff, natural disaster,etc. And thank god we did even though people laughed at us. Well hurricane sandy just devastated are area and I was one of few who didn't have to rush to store for supplies. I am without power except for the three hrs a day we run the generator. I am the only person comfortable on my street. Always better to be safe than sorry! I am glad I saw this list a few things I will def add to my stock for the next unexpected disaster.
    Anonymous said...
    Great list of the basics some items not listed that should be listed like bartering items, Firearms, alternative transportation.
    Anonymous said...
    Great list of basics. It was just what I was looking for to get started. I had many of these at hand wheh Hurricane Sandy devastated our area and our family had food, heat, fuel, water, power, etc. weeks before the rest of the town started to come back. We were able to help our neighbors who hadn't prepared. Thanks so much for posting this.
    Bushcraft and Survival Skills said...
    You're quite welcome! I am glad to hear that you and your family did well through the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, even being able to help your neighbors - That is what being a Prepper is all about!

    Maybe you should send your neighbors a link to this page so that together you can start a emergency preparedness plan.
    Kisha Kitchens said...
    “It is recommended that you prepare your family to be self-sufficient and self-reliant..” – That is a very good point! We cannot predict when or where these unfortunate events might occur, so it is best to be prepared in the best way possible. And your family should also be instructed on what to do when a disaster strikes.
    sherrie jones said...
    I think the site is good. I have been thinking abut this too!!! I read my holy bible and it's coming.I have had my head in the ground to long, no more..For i know what a meltdown can do!! I will get ready now..thank you and i will be on this site more..lol sherrie
    Anonymous said...
    It's very useful. I am from Malaysia - and in cities, some of us stay in condos / apartments. In some condos (especially for the young, single) - there could be hardly any food (let alone other survival items). I would say - forget a major disaster. A simple power outage will be a disaster for most of us (not just where I am!).
    Survival Impact Gear said...
    Definitely a great list of the things you will need to survive in any bad situation. We're definitely bookmarking this page and directing our clients here. Also please check out our on line store for some starter backpacks and survival gear. www.survivalimpact.com
    Anonymous said...
    If you are bunkered, several yards of topsoil, seeds, sand, and sandbags. Modern housing is concealment, not cover. Aside from defensive uses, like closing off windows and doors that can't be defended, and hardened posts, sandbags are practical to make quick raised beds for all that topsoil. If things really go to pot, you will have a lot on your hands and creating a quick raised bed is a nice easy way to get in a crop quickly.

    Clothesline and clothespins make life easier, as does wash tubs and scrub boards. I've been to a lot of these boards and everybody seems to think their clothes will get washed by magic.

    Drugs, tobacco and alcohol are the best barter items, until things get ugly, then the people who desperately want these things won't have anything to barter, so bullets become the favored item. Food, food, food. The simple pleasures of a chocolate bar, caviar, any decadent food is the ultimate barter item. Very expensive alcohol sells best during an economic downturn. The way it was explained to me was that people understand they can't afford a new car during a recession/depression, so they will buy a $200 bottle of hooch to make them feel better. This effect is likely to be magnified if a collapse occurs, but only with proper timing by the person who saved it for a rainy day.
    Anonymous said...
    I would add a few things to the list. Unprocessed sea salt and baking soda. Both have medical uses as well as disinfectant and preservative uses.

    The salt can help lower your food and water consumption but not like you would thin. It actually helps improve hydration which will allow the body to get the maximum benefit from every bite we eat.

    www.watercures.org has more on how.

    The baking soda can be used to treat a number of things like urinary tract infections. It works in 12 hours compared to antibiotics that may take a few to several days.
    Michael Maloney said...
    Baking soda is brilliant stuff and should definitely be on the list of a survivalist. I have only just discovered your blog and recently made a start on compiling and putting into storage the items you suggest. I still have a long way to go until I am ready for a disaster, but feel good for having started.
    oldtimer said...
    Thanks for the site and info. Saw it coming from JFK's era. Grew up with 14 in family in stone house little bigger than dble car garage today. No electricity, no fridge - only a cool gardi safe hung from a tree with damped hessian bag for keeping stuff cool. No running water and an outside john. print paper on a nail served to educate too. Got the kindling done at suns' first rays. learnt how to survive ok. Been keeping up the skills since for a bad hair day, and she's coming! Developed magpie skills and hoarded stuff thut got me through crap times. One man's trash nuther man's treasure. I'm an old man now having lived through every thing the dogs of war could throw at me and mine. Been laughed at a lot. I'm now intensified since Bush, (WMD madness), and the war dog lacky, (executive order freak), shedded their 666 camouflage. Got to agree with posted advice and comments. All mostly spot on. One thing though, being able to see a fair way off is an advantage, trust me on this. Biggest lesson, keep your mouth shut, your stores secret and hidden, and trust no one who hasn't prepared. Spill your guts to 'em, and they'll turn on you like savage dogs. The bloke who commented - see below - is absolutely spot on about barter stuff. He says; "Drugs, tobacco and alcohol are the best barter items, until things get ugly, then the people who desperately want these things won't have anything to barter, so bullets become the favored item. Food, food, food. The simple pleasures of a chocolate bar, caviar, any decadent food is the ultimate barter item. Very expensive alcohol sells best during an economic downturn. The way it was explained to me was that people understand they can't afford a new car during a recession/depression, so they will buy a $200 bottle of hooch to make them feel better. This effect is likely to be magnified if a collapse occurs, but only with proper timing by the person who saved it for a rainy day". It's the creature comforts that gets them. Don't know about the caviar and high falluten food stuff, could be right though,don't come from that side of town. The rest he got right, or some old timer, like me did and passed it on to the youngster. I know because I lived through it, and more than once! Hope no need for the 3B's though (Bullets, Bombs & Blades) although bullets are very handy, especially the 22cal type. Finally, got most of what's needed to survive a really bad crisis. Got a great start from libraries, free you see, trolling though the mid 19th to mid 20th century home DIY books. Now got most of the books for meself from scouring through trash 'n' treasure and garage sales and 2nd hand stores for over 40 years. Worth their weight in gold. Biggest problem we had, keep'n clean clothes, bedding and ourselves. Infections and toothaches a real curse. You can do a lot with a bike to run mechanical devices. Find out how.
    Again, thanks fer the site. Good stuff.

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